Festool vs Cheap tool: Tracksaw Part 1

Hi everyone. A slightly different video for you this week, this is something I’ve wanted to do for a while, to pitch a couple of tools with wildly different prices that essentially do the same job, and see what the differences are. Now a comparison like this may well be unfair, but it is relevant and while I’m no stranger to the Festool brand, I’m also perfectly happy to use a cheaper tool for the same task if it does a decent job.

I’m starting this series with the plunge saw, as it's a tool that’s often the ’gateway drug’ into the Festool system, and for many, myself included, it was the first step on a slippery slope that has you eyeing up their other offerings. But it's also a class of tool that has had some serious price competition of late, especially from far east manufacturers, and own-brands.

In this video I’m comparing my new Festool TS55R (~£380) to an own-brand Titan TTB673CSW tracksaw (~£95); what do you get for your money, and what do you miss out on by buying the cheaper option. Enjoy!

This video is part 1 of 2

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Full list of tools and equipment used at http://www.10minuteworkshop.com

Most links below are affiliate links; this means I may get a few pennies back if you buy something via these links, so if you do, thanks!

Used/featured in this video:-

Festool TS55R Tracksaw - http://amzn.to/2pGvzDS (US: http://amzn.to/2oOgGhw)

Titan TTB673CSW, exclusive to ScrewFix in the UK, I’m afraid
- https://goo.gl/nBzdJu

Festool Midi extractor - http://amzn.to/2tCIN3Q (US: http://amzn.to/2rKNIOx)

Photo/video gear

Main camera Panasonic Lumix G80 - http://amzn.to/2o7uPrx (US - G85: http://amzn.to/2ouTwJV)

Olympus 12-40 f/2.8 - http://amzn.to/2sz34Xy (US: http://amzn.to/2sbYkte)

Second camera Panasonic FZ200 - http://amzn.to/2pj8p6Z (US: http://amzn.to/2oYSGJ0)

Rode Videomic Pro - http://amzn.to/2oTAr5W (US: http://amzn.to/2oOp54A)

See more here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_8sagpnlF1Q

Despite taking an idea as simple as a circular saw riding on a rail, the track saw or guide rail system is anything but simple. Reinventing and completely enhancing cutting adaptability, precision, and accuracy, this cutting system differs from other and, appropriately, provides users some quite robust benefits over other cutting systems.

The plunge-cut circular saw and guide rail system offers smooth rotating action, reduced blade direct exposure, and the capability to produce exact cuts from any point on a panel (something common saws could never ever do and ought to never try); this handful of innovations renders it among the most versatile cutting tools in the market. The system enables users to carry out practically any cutting application from ripping sheet goods, cross-cutting, and producing straight edges in rough stock - to jointing boards and developing openings in panels and in sections of flooring, doors and cabinets. Basically, the track saw is like the supersweet-hybrid outcome of a seriously remarkable panel saw and the market's finest circular saw ever, and, although it's been enlightening users for nearly half a century, the track saw stays among the most exciting innovators in the production market.

Determining which one of these track saws is better than the other, though, is not so easy as you may think - and although I'm partial to Festool to a fault (however not actually "a fault" as Festool really does no wrong, but I digress), the Makita and Dewalt models have their benefits too. In the interest of being honest, I believe the best track saws and the finest rail guide systems still come from their birthplace - Festool, but let me lay down some information to assist you find your own track sawing soul mate:

The saw additionally boasts a continuous anti-kickback mechanism and riving knife to minimize kickback while working, and with a smooth, low-profile blade guard, the saw is can likewise and quickly be utilized is little or uncomfortable spaces. The saw boasts a straight plunge system for ergonomic convenience on the task, and with a 12A, 1300W motor with 1,750 - 4,000 RPM, the circ saw can munch through woods up to 2-1/8" thick.

The DWS520SK includes the saw and guide (of course), and a kit box, blade wrench, and a 48-tooth ultra-fine completing blade. Of course, you might likewise buy the tracks or other accessories for the saw and track independently.

Makita's SP6000K1 system is built around a 6.5" plunge-cut circular saw and 55" guide rail. The guide rail system and circ saw base are developed to connect with one another resulting in perfectly smooth, absolutely exact straight and bevel cuts, and since the tool's electronic speed control maintains constant speed under load, the saw delivers splinter complimentary cuts with a truthfully incredible surface.

Boasting magnesium components the SP6000K1 is light-weight, resilient, and ultra well-balanced, and providing seriously near to the wall cutting, the saw uses extended applications. Also including a smooth plunge release for user comfort, and, maybe among the saw's absolute best features, dual front and rear bevel supports to hold the blade in position (so you do not have to), the thing offers incredibly smooth and dead-on precise bevel cuts. For the sake of total awesomeness, the saw also offers simple depth modification, a depth stop, super-fast blades modifications, an electronic brake for your security and performance, a 1-7/16" rear dust port developed to push material far from the operator (and can likewise link to a collection system), and a saw base that is compatible with contending guide rail systems.


The plunge-cut circular saw and guide rail system offers smooth pivoting action, minimized blade direct exposure, and the capability to develop precise cuts from any point on a panel (something common saws might never do should never attempt); this handful of developments renders it one of the most flexible cutting tools in the market. Essentially, the track saw is like the supersweet-hybrid result of a seriously incredible panel saw and the industry's finest circular saw ever, and, although it's been enlightening users for nearly half a century, the track saw stays one of the most amazing innovators in the production industry.

In the interest of being honest, I think the finest track saws and the finest rail guide systems still come from their birth place - Festool, however let me lay down some information to assist you discover your own track sawing soul mate:

For the sake of overall awesomeness, the saw likewise offers basic depth modification, a depth stop, super-fast blades changes, an electronic brake for your safety and productivity, a 1-7/16" rear dust port developed to press material away from the operator (and can likewise connect to a collection system), and a saw base that is compatible with contending guide rail systems.
Hi everyone. A slightly different video for you this week, this is something I’ve wanted to do for a while, to pitch a couple of tools with wildly different prices that essentially do the same job, and see what the differences are. Now a comparison like this may well be unfair, but it is relevant and while I’m no stranger to th...