How to Use a Router | Woodworking

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Putting bits in is the other thing, though, you'll want to know. And, if I were going to put in one of these router bits, this how you do it.

I'm basically feeding it into the collet. You'll feel it bottom out and what you'll want to do is just tighten it up slightly at that point. But then, pull it out slightly. You don't want it making contact with the bottom of the base there.

And then, tightening these up. This is pretty typical of most routers. Use two wrenches because there's two nuts here that turn against each other.

So, what we're going to do is just get the wrenches on. Tighten the bit. This you want to do pretty firmly. You can do most of it by hand and then use the wrenches. Get a bit tightened.

Okay. Now, depending on whether you're using a plunge or stationary router, the next step involves adjusting the heights. And that's different on each of these.

This is the more complicated machine. And, the way that you would set the height on this machine is that you can use this little turret system over here. This is a way to gradually take material at successive depths of the wood.

One of the limitations of routers, as opposed to using a table saw dado blade, is that you can't take out the full amount, probably, that you want at once with a router bit.

So, for example. With a three quarter inch bit, if I need to go a half inch into the wood, I'm not going to do that all in one pass. Usually, the rule of thumb for router bits is you only want to take half of their width and depth at any one time.

So, for a three quarter inch bit that means my upper limit is going to be three eights of depth in one pass. I only want to go a quarter inch at a time. How do you do that? That's what this turret system is for.

It lets you plunge down to an initial height when you hit the top turret. And then you can rotate over to the other one for your next pass. Plunge down a little more.

And these are graduated at different heights. And you can customize it. But the ones I have it set at, you know, these are offset by quarter inches. And then it goes down an eighth and another quarter.

So, depending on how deep you're going into your wood you just keep going down in successive rotations of this turret.

So, the only work to do at the beginning is setting the initial height. And that basically involves loosening that bar so it can move freely. I'll plunge down until I hit the wood. That's my zero. Because I'm at the level of the wood.

So, what I want to do is just set my zeros, be on. I'll be on the top turret for that one. That's going to be my zero. So, I'll let that sit there. Lock the bar. Pop back up.

Now I know if I go from there to turret number two, when I make this plunge I'm going to be going down a quarter inch from the top of this wood. And only a quarter inch.

So, that's the goal of the plunge router turret mechanism. It just controls the depth of how much can go in each pass.

Now, actually operating this is very simple. There's a power switch up here. Now all these routers are slightly different. But this model has the power switch in the top. It has a lever which enables the plunge to happen. But you can see it's spring loaded.

So, while this lever is out it will just spring back up if I don't let go. If I let go of the lever down here, it stays.

So, the typical way of operating this is turning it on. And you always have the face shield toward you. Turn it on. Plunge down to your cut. Let go of the lever so it stays down there. Make your cut and then plunge back up.

Now, the fixed router is even simpler because we don't have to do any plunging. [So,] the same principles apply in regard to putting in the bits. You get it in there. You feel it bottom out. And you want to pull it up slightly from there.

Not very much. You want as much as that shaft to be in there as possible to reduce vibration. But, you just don't want it bottomed out. Okay. Tighten that up.

Now, with a station router situation, we don't have the option of plunging. We have to just set this at a height. And in this case, if I'm trying to do what this routers doing I'm going to have to set the exposed amount of this bit to be a quarter inch. Because that's the maximum I want to go in a pass, right?

So, I'll set this to be a quarter inch. It's very hard to set these just by eye. With a ruler or some other. There's a lot of other jigs you can use. But always, always test on a scrap piece before you go to your final piece.

Alright. So, let's see. I think I have it about right. A quarter inch. And now I can do my routing .

So, if I wanted to make a slot starting from the end of the piece of wood and going in, I'm

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A router is a very beneficial power tool for boosting the style of any project. You can use a router on wood, fiberglass, and plastic. Use a router to engrave, shape, groove, or to make inlets. The cutting action on a router originates from the sides of it rather than the suggestion. For the best results, choose the grain as you use the router.

There are a variety of different sizes of routers to go for with assorted amounts of power and speeds. Some individuals delight in using a router with a diamond wheel device so they can detail glass and ceramic products. Routers can be annoying in the beginning, but do not be discouraged. Practicing with a router will show you precisely what it can and cannot do.

Ensure you do not move the router too sluggish or you can burn the location you are dealing with. It can also make your bit extremely dull. Due to the fact that your work with be rough and you will likely break your bit, moving the router too fast is dangerous as well. It will take a while for you to get the feel for the right amount of pressure and speed to utilize with your router. If you pay attention to the router carefully you will be able to hear a different sound when you are operating it properly.

The more understanding you have about how your particular design of router works, the handier it will end up being. For the best outcomes with a router, go for one that has a high quantity of horse power.

Regardless of the brand name or size of router you pick to deal with, it will have 3 standard parts - the motor, base, and collet. The motor is really situated within the base. The little the router is kept in place by the collet. There are a number of various bases to pick from. A set base has a bottom plate that is round, side handles, and an adjustable height. Some models come with accessories connected to the side.

The D-shaped deal with base offers a trigger to make the router turn on and off. If you prepare to do an excellent deal with the router, think about buying a package that has both bases, permitting you to interchange them.

Routers have more accessories than any other power tool on the marketplace. There are numerous hundred bits you can select from. A typical device is a router table. They are excellent for attempting to router really small parts, as they wait firmly in place for you. Routers can include a custom finish to your woodworking task.

Routers are frequently rather loud, so ensure you use ear plugs. They can likewise result in big amounts of dust particles in the air depending upon the type of material you are dealing with. A respirator is a great idea if you are utilizing a router on wood. When you run a router, always use eye protection. When you are done using it, do not forget that the idea of the router might be hot.


You can use a router on wood, fiberglass, and plastic. Utilize a router to inscribe, shape, groove, or to make inlets. For the best results, go with the grain as you use the router.

A respirator is a good concept if you are utilizing a router on wood. Don't forget that the idea of the router may be hot when you are done using it.
Watch more Learn Woodworking videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/500362-...Putting bits in is the other thing, though, you'll want to know. And, if I were going to put in one of these router bits, this how you do it.I'm basically feeding it into the collet. You'll feel it bottom out and what you'll want to do is just tighten it up slightly at that point. But then, pull it out slightly. You don't want it making contact with the bottom of the base there.And then, tightening these up. This is pretty typical of most routers. Use two wrenches because there's two nuts here that turn against each other. So, what we're going to do is just get the wrenches on. Tighten the bit. This you want to do pretty firmly. You can do most of it by hand and then use the wrenches. Get a bit tightened.Okay. Now, depending on whether you're using a plunge or stationary router, the next step involves adjusting the heights. And tha...